gunadarma university

Business letter formats

Full Block Form

 

Your Name
Address
Phone Number
E-mail (optional)
Date
Name of Receiver
Title
Company Name
Address

Dear __________:

When writing a letter using block form, no lines are indented. Include your name, address, and phone number where you can be contacted, as well as the date. You then include the name and address of the person you are sending the letter to.

With new paragraphs, just skip a line instead of indenting.

Add your phone number where you can be contacted in the last paragraph. If the receiver needs to use a relay service to call you, briefly explain that you are deaf/ hard-of-hearing and that s/he can call you through relay. Give the receiver his/her state relay number and explain that s/he will need to give the operator your number. Then give him/her your number.

Sincerely,

Your Signature

Your Name
Your Title

 

 

 

 

Indented Paragraphs Form

Your Name
Address
Phone Number
E-mail (optional)

 

Date

Name of Receiver
Title
Company Name
Address

Dear __________:

When writing a letter using indented form, indent each paragraph. First include your name, address, phone number, and the date. This information should be located at the top of the page, either in the center, or indented on the right side of the paper. You then include the name and address of the person to whom you are sending the letter.
At the end of the letter, place your signature on the right side of the page. Don’t forget to provide any relay information if necessary.

 

Sincerely,

Your Signature

Your Name
Your Title

 

 

 

 

Blocked Paragraphs Form

Your Name
Address
Phone Number
E-mail (optional)

 

Date

Name of Receiver
Title
Company Name
Address

Dear __________:

When writing a letter using blocked form, indent each paragraph. First include your name, address, phone number, and the date. This information should be located at the top of the page, either in the center, or indented on the right side of the paper. You then include the name and address of the person to whom you are sending the letter.
At the end of the letter, place your signature on the right side of the page. Don’t forget to provide any relay information if necessary.

 

Sincerely,

Your Signature

Your Name
Your Title

 

 

 

 

Simplified Style Form

 

Your Name
Address
Phone Number
E-mail (optional)
Date
Name of Receiver
Title
Company Name
Address
SUBJECT LINE (use capital letters)
When writing a letter using simplified style form, put the date on the left. Then, put the receiver’s name, and his/her title, company name, and address.

Write a subject line instead of a salutation. The subject line must be in all capital letters.

At the end of the letter, put your name and title, all in capital letters.
YOUR NAME
YOUR TITLE

 

 

 

 

OTHER OPTIONS

 

  • If you are using block format, you can place your address anywhere on the letter. You can place it at the top of the page (top center or top right side), or you can put your address at the end of the letter after your signature and name, regardless of which format you use.
  • If you are using block form, you can place the date on the left, in the center, or on the right. However, if you are using the indented form, it is usually better to place the date on the right or on the left. Do not put it in the center.
  • With the indented form, you can put your signature on the right or left side of the page.
  • If you want to make your letter stand out, boldly type your name in a larger font at the top of the letter and type your address just below it in a smaller font.

 

Ambition By Kahlil Gibran

Three men met at a tavern table.  One was a weaver, another a
carpenter and the third a ploughman.

Said the weaver, “I sold a fine linen shroud today for two pieces
of gold.  Let us have all the wine we want.”

“And I,” said the carpenter, “I sold my best coffin.  We will have
a great roast with the wine.”

“I only dug a grave,” said the ploughman, “but my patron paid me
double.  Let us have honey cakes too.”

And all that evening the tavern was busy, for they called often
for wine and meat and cakes.  And they were merry.

And the host rubbed his hands and smiled at his wife; for his guests
were spending freely.

When they left the moon was high, and they walked along the road
singing and shouting together.

The host and his wife stood in the tavern door and looked after
them.

“Ah!” said the wife, “these gentlemen!  So freehanded and so gay!
If only they could bring us such luck every day!  Then our son need
not be a tavern-keeper and work so hard.  We could educate him,
and he could become a priest.”

The Good God and the Evil God By Kahlil Gibran

The Good God and the Evil God met on the mountain top.

The Good God said, “Good day to you, brother.”

The Evil God did not answer.

And the Good God said, “You are in a bad humour today.”

“Yes,” said the Evil God, “for of late I have been often mistaken for you, called by your name, and treated as if I were you, and it ill-pleases me.”

And the Good God said, “But I too have been mistaken for you and called by your name.”

The Evil God walked away cursing the stupidity of man.

“The Perfect World” By Kahlil Gibran

God of lost souls, thou who are lost amongst the gods, hear me:

Gentle Destiny that watchest over us, mad, wandering spirits, hear me:

I dwell in the midst of a perfect race, I the most imperfect.

I, a human chaos, a nebula of confused elements, I move amongst finished worlds—peoples of complete laws and pure order, whose thoughts are assorted, whose dreams are arranged, and whose visions are enrolled and registered.

Their virtues, O God, are measured, their sins are weighed, and even the countless things that pass in the dim twilight of neither sin nor virtue are recorded and catalogued.

Here days and night are divided into seasons of conduct and governed by rules of blameless accuracy.

To eat, to drink, to sleep, to cover one’s nudity, and then to be weary in due time.

To work, to play, to sing, to dance, and then to lie still when the clock strikes the hour.

To think thus, to feel thus much, and then to cease thinking and feeling when a certain star rises above yonder horizon.

To rob a neighbour with a smile, to bestow gifts with a graceful wave of the hand, to praise prudently, to blame cautiously, to destroy a sound with a word, to burn a body with a breath, and then to wash the hands when the day’s work is done.

To love according to an established order, to entertain one’s best self in a preconceived manner, to worship the gods becomingly, to intrigue the devils artfully—and then to forget all as though memory were dead.

To fancy with a motive, to contemplate with consideration, to be happy sweetly, to suffer nobly—and then to empty the cup so that tomorrow may fill it again.

All these things, O God, are conceived with forethought, born with determination, nursed with exactness, governed by rules, directed by reason, and then slain and buried after a prescribed method. And even their silent graves that lie within the human soul are marked and numbered.

It is a perfect world, a world of consummate excellence, a world of supreme wonders, the ripest fruit in God’s garden, the master-thought of the universe.

But why should I be here, O God, I a green seed of unfulfilled passion, a mad tempest that seeketh neither east nor west, a bewildered fragment from a burnt planet?
Why am I here, O God of lost souls, thou who art lost amongst the gods

William Shakespeare “When Priests Are More in World…”

(From “King Lear”)

When priests are more in world than matter;

When brewers mar their malt with water;

When nobles are their tailors’ tutors;

Nor heretics burn’d, but wenches’ suitors;

When every case in law is right;

No squire in debt, nor no poor knight;

When slanders do not live in tongues,

Nor cutpurses come not to throngs;

When usurers tell their gold i’ the field,

And bawds and whores do churches built;

Then shall the realm of Albion

Come to great confusion:

Then comes the time, who live to see’t,

That going shall be used by feet.

William Shakespeare “Not Marble, Nor the Gilded Monuments”

(From “Sonnets”, LV)

Not marble, nor the gilded monuments

Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;

But you shall shine more bright in these contents

Than unswept stone, besmear’d with sluttish time.

When wasteful war will statues overturn,

And broils root out the work of masonry,

Nor Mars’s his sword nor war’s quick fire shall burn

The living record of your memory.

‘Gainst death and all-oblivious enmity

Shall you pace forth; your praise shall still find room,

Even in eyes of all posterity

That wear this word out to the ending doom.

So, till the judgment that yourself arise,

You live in this, and dwell in lovers’ eyes.

William Shakespeare “Like As the Waves…”

(From “Sonnets”, LX)

Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,

So do our minutes hasten to the end;

Each changing place with that which goes before.

In sequent toil all forward do contend.

Nativity, once in the main of light,

Crawls to maturity , wherewith being crown’d,

Crooked eclipses ‘gainst his story fight,

And Time, that gave, doth now his gift confound.

Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth,

And delves the parallels in beauties brow;

Feeds on the rarities of nature’s truth,

And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow.

And yet, to times in hope, my verse shall stand,

Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand.